Mychal Thompson: Klay Doesn’t Need Much Help From Me

Mychal Thompson spent 13 years in the NBA. He was the No. 1 overall pick in 1978 and won two titles with the Showtime Lakers in 1986 and 1987. Thus, you would expect Thompson to frequently impart NBA wisdom on his son, Klay, who is averaging 21.6 points per game for the 50-5 Golden State Warriors.

Nope.

“A little bit. Not too much,” Thompson said on CBS Sports Radio’s Gio and Jones, when asked how much he talks to his son during the season. “He’s a pretty smart kid. He knows what he’s doing, he’s very well-coached, he’s got good guys around him, so he doesn’t need too much input from me. Every now and then, I might shoot him a little text or offer a little advice or a little insight. But hey, they’re 50-5, he’s a two-time All-Star, a (FIBA) World Cup gold medalist, (he) has a chance to be on the Olympic team, it looks like they’re going to win another title – he doesn’t need too much from me.”

Thompson and the Warriors have been on an NBA rampage this season, often turning to their bench in the fourth quarter to play out meaningless minutes against overmatched opponents.

How exactly do you stop this team?

“Listen, you can’t,” Thompson said. “You know that it’s hard to beat a team that shoots the ball so well. Right now, the Warriors are the greatest shooting team in the history of basketball. Everybody on that team can shoot. When you have five guys who can knock down shots and spread you out who are versatile the way they are on both ends of the floor, there’s nothing you can do about it. If you’re playing against a guy and he can just flat out shoot, you can be in his face all day and he’s making shots. There’s nothing you can do, and that’s what that team does. They shoot the ball so well that they just demoralize teams.”

After going 67-15 last season, the Warriors, many analysts said, would surely regress a few games in the standings. Maybe finish with 62 wins. Maybe 63. Instead, they’ve been leaps and bounds better. Part of that is due to another year of experience and continuity, and part of that is due to, well, anger.

Yes, there are those who said the Warriors got lucky in winning an NBA title last year. After all, they avoided the Spurs in the playoffs and faced a series of injury-depleted teams, including the Cavaliers, who played the Finals without Kevin Love and all but one Finals game without Kyrie Irving.

Instead of a championship hangover, the Warriors have played this season with a voracious championship hunger.

“That’s definitely part of the motivation for this team to go out and prove to people that last year was not a fluke,” Thompson said. “I hope they keep that chip on their shoulder for the next five years.”

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